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Road.cc Tests Lezyne’s Sport Digital Drive

Sport Digital Drive
Road.cc – Sport Digital Drive

Road.cc Tests Lezyne’s Sport Digital Drive

Road.cc scored Lezyne’s Sport Digital Floor Drive as a 4-star quality pump in their recent test and review.

“I found the digital gauge hugely useful. It’s simply easier to inflate the tyre to the desired pressure. You can be very accurate to the exact pressure you want. DV head: it’s a big improvement on the old screw-on nozzle on the original Lezyne track pump that is still doing service in my garage.”

Check out the full review at Road.cc to see all the good things they had to say about our highly accurate pump.

Road.cc Takes a Look At Lezyne’s New Products

Lezyne's New Products
Road.cc Lezyne’s New Products

Road.cc Takes a Look At Lezyne’s New Products

Road.cc took the time during Taipei Cycle Show 2014 to come by the Lezyne booth and take a little sneak peek at some of the new goodies that we have to offer for the next year. Although these products are still in the works, take a look at their recent article that reviews our new products that they got to take a look at during Taipei Show 2014.

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Smart light good for those who want a commuting torch powerful enough for occasional on and off-road night riding.

Lezyne have built a solid reputation in five short years for revolutionizing the multi-tool market, making tools for the first time sexy.

They’ve since expanded the range into other areas, the latest addition is a range of three LED lights. We’ve got our hands on the most powerful of the three, the Super Drive.

Packing 450 Lumens, this is the brightest on offer (the Mini Drive, reviewed here, has an output of 150 Lumens, while the mid-range Power Drive puts out 300 Lumens), and with a price tag of £99.99, it’s immediately clear you’re getting a decent whack of illumination for little money (it is significantly cheaper, for example, than the Exposure Lights Joystick, which only manages 325 Lumens ).

So already it’s off to a good start. A rechargeable Li-Ion battery provides 1.5 hours of juice on the full 450 Lumen mode, while the rubber button on the top of the light can be used to cycle through the other three modes; medium, which sees battery life extended to a more useable 2.5 hours, low and flashing.

Lezyne developed their own lens to make the most of the available output from the Cree LED. Combined with a mirror polished parabolic reflector, the 450 Lumens spill out with a very wide beam.

Charging is simply a matter of using the supplied USB cable, removing the light from the mount and, turning it upside down to reveal the charge port cleverly tucked underneath a rubber protective flap. Charge it at your desk during work hours and it takes about four hours to top up from empty.

The clever mount – it uses a knurled thumb screw designed to prevent over tightening – keeps the light securely in place. Very little bounce occurred even over some of the rougher paths we encountered when taking the light off-road. Each light comes with two mounts, for 31.8mm and 25.4mm bars.

A very useful touch, and something that shows Lezyne really do pay attention to the details, is the small amount of rotation the clamp design allows. You can point the light just where you want it, especially useful if you can’t or don’t want to fit the light right up beside the stem (if you’ve have a Garmin fitted for example).

All in all, Lezyne’s first entry into lights is a well priced, nicely designed and focused light that offers a surprisingly powerful beam.

Performance

Lezyne have set their sights on cycle commuters and those after an affordable, small and light unit that doesn’t break the bank.

However, that said 450 Lumens is still a decent whack of output (certainly more than we had when we first started night riding ten years ago) and we found it the beam ideal for riding on unlit roads when using the most powerful setting, although the battery life is limiting for extended rides.

We’ve also found the Super Drive to pump out enough light for off-ride night riding, providing your sticking to a reasonable speed on familiar trails. However, the launch of Lezyne’s helmet mount (available separately for £16.99) means it can be combined with a more powerful bar-mounted beam, making the Super Drive the ideal filler light for those spots, particularly corners, that the fixed main beam can’t reach.

All that makes the Lezyne Super Drive a smartly designed torch good for those who want a commuting light powerful enough for occasional on and off-road night riding.

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Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Flow Cage Reviewed by Road.cc

Lezyne Flow Cage

Lezyne Flow Cage Reviewed by Road.cc

Lezyne Flow Bottle Cage – £7.99…..A good-value plastic cage that is a tenacious bottle holder

The Lezyne Flow is a bottle cage done a bit different. Lezyne have made a name for themselves by taking old, boring bicycle bits and bobs, giving them a bit of a zhush, making them work better, be more shiny and somehow muchly desirable… and that’s exactly what they’ve done here. Except it’s not that shiny.

Made from a durable, fibre-reinforced Composite Matrix material that looks a lot like plastic, the Flow cage is all, er, flowy with its X-Grip architecture swooping up and around a bottle to cradle it securely, with big twin tabs at the bottom holding it in and smaller ones at the top making sure it doesn’t bounce out.

Bolting the Flow to a bike is easy because both mounting holes are over 12mm long. That means there’s plenty of wiggle room for any slightly sub-standard bottle-boss spacing in the frame or subtle cage jiggling to clear pumps, other bottles and frame tubes.

Removing a bottle from the cage requires a reassuringly firm tug as the reinforced Composite Matrix flexes to release its cargo. Returning a bottle to the Flow is a little less instinctive. It has to be inserted at quite an angle compared to more traditional bottle-cages in order to clear the pair of small retaining tabs at the top that do such a good job of holding onto a bidon.

A bottle needs to be offered up at about 45 degrees to the cage, give or take, and then curved into the cage via the wide mouth. It’s not difficult, it just requires a bit of fumbly relearning and soon becomes second nature, though this might be a problem if you ride a small or compact frame, or have a high bottle-cage position.

Once in, the Flow the bottle isn’t going to move. This particular Lezyne cage has been across a whole mountain range on the road and on numerous bumpy excursions on a cyclo-cross bike and the water bottle hasn’t budged an inch. There hasn’t even been a rattle. Lovely.

At 49g it could almost be considered a heavyweight in bottle cage terms, but it does cost less than a tenner, so light weight isn’t its prime selling point. Similarly, its fluid plastic construction suits flowy plasticy and swoopy hydroformed alloy bikes better. Owners of more traditionally tubed bikes might be better served by one of Lezyne’s more tubular bottle-cages if that aesthetic sort of thing bothers you.

Finally, and best of all, the Flow hasn’t marked any of the bottles that it’s had in its charge. No scratched logos, no scored bodies, no new bottles looking scruffy and dirty in a couple of rides. Smart. Literally.

As an aside, the Flow bottle cage is remarkably similar to the Flow Cage HP. Actually, it’s exactly the same but for the addition of two bits of sponge stuck each side of the body to support a Lezyne mini-pump and a strap threaded through the cage to hold it there. So if you want this cage but with mini-pump holding capability, go for that one. It weighs 3g more, thanks to the strap, and costs £4 extra.

Verdict

A good-value plastic cage that is a tenacious bottle holder