Cedric Gracia gets 3rd at Santos Urban DH Race in Copacabana, Brazil

CG on top of the podium at the start of the year. Good things to come. Some people may think he’s “getting old”, but we at Lezyne very much disagree and this is why.

Here’s what Cedric had to say about his race in Copacabana, Brazil:

“Last Sunday was the 10th anniversary of Santos DH urban race, Marcelo and Juliana invite me to take part one more time to this event who is for me the first race of the season. This year a lot of international riders was there and record of TV audience for Globo TV with 50 million people watching the event in all over Latin America!

The race went well for the Brigade, Saturday qualification went to Marcelo and on Sunday a 3th place for me in the final.

It was the first time I was racing with two new partners Fox racing shox and Shimano. Thanks to you guys for the trust and the support who made that podium possible!

Special thanks to the Shimano Brazil team for the warm welcome and your help.

Next stop Chili, Valparaiso!”

Thanks everyone for the support and following on Facebook.

The Sergeant

CG

Cedric Gracia

Initial Review: Lezyne’s Compact Super Drive Headlight

Initial Review: Lezyne's Compact Super Drive Headlight

Initial Review: Lezyne’s Compact Super Drive Headlight

Thanks to all great folks over at BikeRumor.com, enlightening the world about all of the great and not so great products in the industry. In all honesty, I didn’t expect to like Lezyne’s Super Drive.  As a commuter who regularly starts and finishes his morning commute in the dark, I’ve been spoiled by trail-ready 900+ Lumen lighting systems and the vision -and visibility- that they guarantee.  Coming from substantially more powerful lighting systems, I wasn’t sure what a 450 Lumen light with a mere 90 minute runtime could offer- especially at $110.  After about eight weeks of near-daily use, I now know- and have taken quite the shine to the little light.  Click through to find out more…

With its replaceable internal rechargeable battery, the Super Drive is a slick little package.  Slightly smaller than an Exposure Joystick, the Superdrive is similarly built almost entirely from aluminum, making for a sturdy light.  Tool-free 31.8mm and 25.4mm Composite Matrix (plastic) bar mounts are included in the package, as is a Mini USB charging cable.  Though there is no battery gauge on the light itself, the LED itself flashes while charging.  Though it’s tempting to use the Super Drive as a flashlight, Lezyne warn users not to- without cycling’s air flow, the light can’t evacuate the heat generated by the LED emitter and the body can in my exterience get quite hot.

Initial Review: Lezyne's Compact Super Drive Headlight

Lezyne’s Uniform Power Beam reflector makes the most of the light’s moderate 450 Lumen claimed output (on high- medium and low put out 300 and 150 Lumen, respectively).  Though not as pencil-thin as the Joystick’s, the Super Drive’s beam is among the more focused I’ve seen on the bike and the concentrated center makes it seem a whole lot brighter than it should be.  The beam almost creates a tunnel of light for riding in- not really broad enough for bar-mounted mountain biking, but plenty wide for road and commuter biking.  Aimed properly, I haven’t found myself wanting for more than the Super Drive’s high output while commuting, even at 30mph.  The hooded is a nice touch and does a good job at preventing accidental self-blinding when standing for climbs. (Why doesn’t everyone do this?)

Initial Review: Lezyne's Compact Super Drive Headlight

Though it’s reasonably stable once fitted, the combination of the charging port seal and aggressive tab on the hot shoe-style bar mount makes mounting the Super Drive a 2-handed affair.  Despite tightening the thumb screw as much as I could, it remains easy to aim the light from side (and so also to knock it off center). The location of the charging port and its chunky rubber cover make it difficult to charge the light while it’s mounted- not a big deal unless you have an outlet near your bicycle parking spot.

About the diameter of a roll of quarters and the length of a smartphone, the Super Drive is easy to remove from the bike when locking up for the day.  The 90 minute runtime requires regular topping off- thankfully the USB charging port makes at-work charging easy.

Initial Review: Lezyne's Compact Super Drive Headlight

As good as it is, with its relatively focused beam and light 125g weight, the Super Drive is really screaming for a helmet mount.  This would make the most of the beam, allow the rider to catch the eye of drivers merging from side streets, and enable off-road use. Happily, one is in the pipeline and should be reaching distributors by the middle of February.  For the next generation, a bit of clipping at the top of the beam might be nice as well.  Aiming the center spot fairly far out makes the most of it’s punch- a rotated “D” shape might make a bit more of the light’s output while sparing oncoming traffic.  But these would be a minor change and do little to take the shine off the little Lezyne.

Though it may not seem like it on paper, the Super Drive is a heck of a package- and especially impressive for a first effort.  The price is reasonable, additional batteries are available if needed, and the output is surprisingly punchy.  The self-contained design has sidelined my more powerful headlight for commuting- and I haven’t missed that light’s higher output.  If the forthcoming helmet mount is half-decent, the convenience and safety of its high position could well make it the commuter light to beat.  Stay tuned for more…

Initial Review: Lezyne's Compact Super Drive Headlight

Lezyne signs Danny Macaskill for 2012

Lezyne signs Danny Macaskill for 2012

Lezyne has been fortunate enough to sign on with the ever-talented bike rider Danny Macaskill. Talent for days…..a match made in heaven.

“Danny Macaskill is a man in demand and has been since he burst on to the international scene a couple of years ago with his first Youtube video. And for good reason for his riding exudes class, style and individualism. Which is precisely why he has recently been signed by Lezyne as their latest sponsored rider. We took the opportunity to catch up with him in his adopted city of Edinburgh where he was recently shooting a promo video for his newest sponsor who have just launched their 2012 range of workshop tools. While the video may not be quite ready to air on Pinkbike, read on for the exclusive interview:

I’d been working on my bikes in my flat for a while with really cheap, nasty multi-tools that my friend had from decathlon or somewhere like that, real nasty things, and after working in a bike shop for a while you get used to using nicer tools. But I had a little Lezyne multi tool, and I’d also seen some of their other stuff on the net, so I thought they’d be a cool company to approach. I liked their brand image and more importantly I knew they made good stuff. So we got in touch and it’s been cool that we’ve managed to work something out. It didn’t take long to sort things out either, they were really easy to talk to and I’m just delighted to have all the products – it’s gone from having the bare essentials to having all the tools to tune the bike up and keep it in good working order. It rounds things off for me – I’d got my bike setup all dialled and now it’s nice to have all the right stuff to maintain them properly too.”

“What are your plans for 2012?”

“I’ve been off the bike for a while, pretty much since Crankworx. I’d been carrying a knee injury for a while before that, but then I tore my meniscus. I’ve had a really weak leg for the past eight months, through the filming of my last video as well. It turned out I’ve actually got a torn disc in my back too so I’ve really been trying to get that sorted out without an operation. I had a steroid injection into one of my discs, but I’ve not really felt the benefits of that so I’m going to go back out to the US to get it sorted. Once that’s fixed I’ve got a really exciting year coming up. I’m hoping to get into a position so I’ll have a good setup to learn new tricks and do some new videos. I hope to be hanging out down in London for a bit which’ll be cool. It’s going to be a really exciting year, I just need my health to catch up.”

“I’d love to do some mountain bike races in amongst all my trials riding. It tends to be quite hard as a lot of my free time between projects is taken up with injuries at the moment. Things are stacking up and then a few projects end up going back to back. But I’d love to do some races, I’d love to go out to the mega this year, it’s been a couple years since I’ve done that. Some friends are also going out to do the Trans-Provence race which is a 7-day enduro. It’s the Enduro stuff that I’m into the most and it’s just a lot of fun, a lot of time on the bike. Other than that I’ll just see what I can do, maybe some local races in Scotland. Are you getting much enduro/all mountain riding in just now? It’s enduro/all mountain riding that I do the most, you just can’t beat playing about in the mud. And I mainly ride my (Orange) Five for that when it’s pouring with rain and blowing a force ten hooley (Translation from Scottish: very windy or an unreasonably strong wind). And it’s been blowing like that all winter here, so when my knee and back are feeling alright I’m trying to get out to cruise about as much as I can, I really can’t get enough of it.”

“It’s just really nice to be able to pedal back up and smash back down them on the same bike. I absolutely love it. I’d say I get more of a buzz out of riding my mountainbike than my trials bike, you know, because you get more adrenaline which you don’t really get in trials because you’re really in control. Whereas I’m completely out of control on my mountainbike, I’m just a passenger. That’s definitely how it is, I ride it way out of my skill level most of the time – feet flailing about the place, as long as I make it down to the bottom with the bike it’s ok. I’d like to get some night riding in this winter too and Lezyne are hooking me up with some of their lights to cut about with so it should be fun, it’s just really good fun. I like that feeling of not quite seeing round the corner, it makes the same trails you ride every day completely different.”

Worrack Wins 1st UCI Stage of 2012 for Lululemon

February 2nd, Doha, Qatar - Trixi Worrack took the first UCI Stage win for 2012 for Specialized-lululemon on Thursday, winning the second stage of Tour of Qatar from a two person break.

lezyne_lululemon

Worrack, who also made the break of the day on Wednesday in Stage One, was able to make the break again in the famous cross-winds that make the Tour of Qatar what it is.

“I’m really happy with the way the team raced today,” said Team Director Jens Zemke. “Yesterday we had three in the break but made some tactical errors, but today they made up for it.”

The Specialized-lululemon women along with the Green Edge team forced the race into the gutter from the stage start with the winning break escaping from the front group with 15km remaining in the race. Worrack and Judith Arndt went away with Adrie Visser and Kirsten Wild but were able to drop them with 12km to go and arrive at thefinish line for a two-up spring. Worrack won from Arndt and now sits in second place overall behind Arndt with one stage remaining.

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“I’m really happy to win a stage here in my first race with Specialized-lululemon,” said Worrack. “It’s hard and fun racing here and we’re really enjoying racing together.”

Worrack’s team-mate, Chloe Hosking wears the Best Young Rider’s jersey and Specialized-lululemon leads the team classification.

Topeak vs. Lezyne: Handpump Comparison

Topeak vs. Lezyne: Handpump Comparison

Topeak vs. Lezyne: Handpump Comparison

A great side by side of two very similar products: Topeak and Lezyne pump. And……….Lezyne wins.

Is there anything more frustrating than a lousy handpump? In our short cycling career I must have gone through a dozen pumps, most of which are now landfill. There are two main requirements for a good handpump in my humble opinion: it must fasten securely to the valve stem, and you must be able to apply sufficient pressure when pumping.

We have two pumps which meet these criteria: a Topeak Roadmorph, and a Lezyne something-or-other, both of which are pictured below for a side-by-side comparison. The Lezyne is the shiny one.

When fully compacted, both pumps are about the same length. The Topeak is slightly longer (with a corresponding increase in stroke length) and slightly slimmer. The Lezyne has more girth because its rubber hose is wrapped around the body, whereas the Topeak’s rubber hose has a sliding insertion into the housing of the pressure gauge.

In both cases, the rubber hose is a significant plus. The hose enables you to place the pump on the ground and apply good, hard pressure. Pumps without a hose require you to secure one end of the pump against the valve and then apply pressure with only the strength of your arms. I’m a weakling – it doesn’t work for me.

Both pumps have a small lever on which you can brace your foot. In practice these are not very useful unless you have the flexibility of a gymnast.

The pump handles have been designed to let you press down hard without spearing your palm. They both work moderately well, though I find the Topeak handle a bit less comfortable than the Lezyne. (The Topeak handle has not been spread out in the photo below.)

The most significant functional difference between the pumps is the way they secure themselves to the tyre valve. The Topeak uses a cam lever to clasp itself to the valve, whereas the Lezyne is threaded on directly. The Topeak is faster to put in place (if you get it right the first time), but the Lezyne is a more “positive” fit.

Also, the valve fitting of the Lezyne is dual-purpose. It can be removed and flipped to either a Schrader or Presta fitting, whereas the Topeak is single-purpose. This is a big feature for me. When I take the Lezyne, I know I don’t have to worry whether I have grabbed the right pump for the bike I’m riding.

Finally, both pumps have a pressure gauge. The Topeak’s gauge has very tiny numerals and is harder to read for those of us with tired eyes. On the Lezyne you can see the mechanics of the spring mechanism that measures pressure. However, its numerals are stenciled on the outside of the barrel – I don’t know if they will wear off over time.

In neither case is the gauge smooth. They adjust to an initial reading on the first stroke, and then stay put for the next 4 or 5 strokes before jumping to a new reading.

These are the best two hand pumps I have come across. When touring I like to give the tyres a boost in the morning to about 110 psi, and both pumps perform extremely well. I find the Lezyne slightly more comfortable to use, and the dual-purpose valve fitting is a major positive for me. Besides, its pressure gauge is very cool.

Topeak vs. Lezyne: Handpump Comparison

Topeak vs. Lezyne: Handpump Comparison

Topeak vs. Lezyne: Handpump Comparison=

Topeak vs. Lezyne: Handpump Comparison

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Smart light good for those who want a commuting torch powerful enough for occasional on and off-road night riding.

Lezyne have built a solid reputation in five short years for revolutionizing the multi-tool market, making tools for the first time sexy.

They’ve since expanded the range into other areas, the latest addition is a range of three LED lights. We’ve got our hands on the most powerful of the three, the Super Drive.

Packing 450 Lumens, this is the brightest on offer (the Mini Drive, reviewed here, has an output of 150 Lumens, while the mid-range Power Drive puts out 300 Lumens), and with a price tag of £99.99, it’s immediately clear you’re getting a decent whack of illumination for little money (it is significantly cheaper, for example, than the Exposure Lights Joystick, which only manages 325 Lumens ).

So already it’s off to a good start. A rechargeable Li-Ion battery provides 1.5 hours of juice on the full 450 Lumen mode, while the rubber button on the top of the light can be used to cycle through the other three modes; medium, which sees battery life extended to a more useable 2.5 hours, low and flashing.

Lezyne developed their own lens to make the most of the available output from the Cree LED. Combined with a mirror polished parabolic reflector, the 450 Lumens spill out with a very wide beam.

Charging is simply a matter of using the supplied USB cable, removing the light from the mount and, turning it upside down to reveal the charge port cleverly tucked underneath a rubber protective flap. Charge it at your desk during work hours and it takes about four hours to top up from empty.

The clever mount – it uses a knurled thumb screw designed to prevent over tightening – keeps the light securely in place. Very little bounce occurred even over some of the rougher paths we encountered when taking the light off-road. Each light comes with two mounts, for 31.8mm and 25.4mm bars.

A very useful touch, and something that shows Lezyne really do pay attention to the details, is the small amount of rotation the clamp design allows. You can point the light just where you want it, especially useful if you can’t or don’t want to fit the light right up beside the stem (if you’ve have a Garmin fitted for example).

All in all, Lezyne’s first entry into lights is a well priced, nicely designed and focused light that offers a surprisingly powerful beam.

Performance

Lezyne have set their sights on cycle commuters and those after an affordable, small and light unit that doesn’t break the bank.

However, that said 450 Lumens is still a decent whack of output (certainly more than we had when we first started night riding ten years ago) and we found it the beam ideal for riding on unlit roads when using the most powerful setting, although the battery life is limiting for extended rides.

We’ve also found the Super Drive to pump out enough light for off-ride night riding, providing your sticking to a reasonable speed on familiar trails. However, the launch of Lezyne’s helmet mount (available separately for £16.99) means it can be combined with a more powerful bar-mounted beam, making the Super Drive the ideal filler light for those spots, particularly corners, that the fixed main beam can’t reach.

All that makes the Lezyne Super Drive a smartly designed torch good for those who want a commuting light powerful enough for occasional on and off-road night riding.

www.upgradebikes.co.uk

www.lezyne.com

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Lezyne Super Drive Front Light Review

Team UK Youth reveal 2012 kit and sponsors at Gran Canaria Camp and runs Lezyne

Team UK Youth

Team UK Youth reveal 2012 kit and sponsors at Gran Canaria Camp and runs Lezyne

Team UK Youth have revealed their full team line-up and new kit for the 2012 season at their recent training camp in Gran Canaria and are working with Lezyne tools and tech.

In 2012, the team will ride bespoke bikes from WyndyMilla and take on an increased programme in the UK, Europe and the rest of the world; spreading the message of charity UK Youth further afield.

The team will still be supported and sponsored by Formula 1 world champion Nigel Mansell CBE and headed up by Paris-Roubaix winner and Tour de France rider Magnus Backstedt.

“The camp has been an excellent experience for us,” said Magnus Backstedt. “The team are getting on well, I think we’ve got a strong and very powerful team here for 2012 as we look to race an increased and improved calendar as a UCI Continental team.”

Other key sponsors include Mercedes Benz and Rygor Commercials Ltd, suppliers of the team’s vehicles. Riders are powered by Maxifuel. Their WyndyMilla bikes feature Reynolds wheels, Continental tyres and Speedplay Pedals.

Riders enjoyed the chance to try out their new kit and accessories. The 2012 Team UK Youth team will wear adidas Eye Wear, Bont shoes, Tec helmets and use Lezyne tools and pumps.

Backstedt continued: “Gran Canaria provided a great backdrop for us to train consistently for two weeks, with some stunning and challenging climbs helping us prepare for some of the toughest races this season. The team looks fantastic and we’re just looking forward to representing UK Youth in 2012.”

The new Team UK Youth website has now been launched at www.teamukyouth.co.uk.

Founded in 1911, UK Youth is a leading national youth work charity supporting over 750,000 young people, helping them to raise their aspirations, realise their potential and have their achievements recognised via non-formal, accredited education programmes and activities.

Team UK Youth 2012 riders and staff

Magnus Backstedt
Yanto Barker
Niklas Gustavsson
Chris Opie
Freddy Johansson
James Stewart
David McGowan
Richard Tanguy
Greg Mansell
Gruff Lewis
James Lowsley-Williams
Christofer Stevenson

Staff

Nigel Mansell CBE – Team Owner
Leo Mansell – Managing Director
Becky Frewing – Team Manager
David Povall – Directeur Sportif
Steve Davis – Team Mechanic
David Hart – Mechanic

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

Guitar Ted reviews our Super and Mini Drive lights. An honest and well-thought out review. Thank you sir.

We at Twenty Nine Inches received a pair of Lezyne’s 2012 LED lights a while back for test/review. We had heard about these new products last year at a Press Camp attended by Grannygear and when the products were ready, Grannygear and Guitar Ted each got a sample to test out. Granygear received the Mini Drive while Guitar Ted reviews the Super Drive here. Without further adieu, here are their thoughts on these new for Lezyne products, the Super Drive and Mini Drive LED lights.

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

Guitar Ted’s Super Drive Review: When I heard Lezyne was going to do a line of LED lights, I was intrigued. I have used their pumps and have seen their accessories for cyclists, so the overall look and function of their products was well known to me. Would a line of LED lights live up to expectations? Grannygear’s trip to vist Lezyne only whetted my appetite even more after he described some of the lights he saw then to me over the phone. To say that my expectations were set at a high level is an understatement.

Impressions And Tech Intro: I received the Super Drive and was immediately struck by how diminutive it was for a rated 450 Lumen of lighting power. The pewter anodized look was typically elegant for a Lezyne product, and as far as aesthetics go, this met my approval and expectations right out of the box. The battery for the unit is a 18650 Li-ion button top 3.7V cell with built in protection for overcharging and over discharging, but it isn’t unusual enough that a serviceable replacement couldn’t be found. (Note: Lezyne says only their battery should be used in the Super Drive). Lezyne does sell spare batteries if you want to have back ups available. You also get mounts suitable for 31.8mm or 25.4mm bars in the box along with the USB type cord for recharging duties.

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

The battery needs to be charged out of the box, and the port for the cable is located underneath the light body, covered by a thick, rubber piece that is tethered to the main light body. Plug in the USB cord to any computer or USB compatible wall charger and the Power Drive blinks softly to let you know it is taking a charge. It stops blinking when it is done, and to double check the level, you unplug, then plug in again, at which time the light should blink once and cease. I had to do this three times upon the first charging to see one blink, and the total time to charge was about an hour and a half out of the box. This went away and the light charged as described in the instructions after a couple of uses.

The mount is simple, made of plastic, and has a thumb screw style attachment. The light clips into this base in a rather simple but effective manner. It allows the light body to swivel a few degrees so you can center the beam pattern and of course, you can swivel the entire mount around your bars to attain the perfect beam spot pattern on the trail that you are riding. Note: I never had any issues with the mount in rough terrain. It always held the light body firmly in place. The Lezyne Super Drive weighs in at 140 grams with the 31.8mm mount. Just recently a helmet mount was announced by Lezyne that fits all the LED lights in their line-up.

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

Run times are as follows:
High: 450 lumens- 1.5hr
Medium: 300 lumens- 2.5hr
Low: 100 lumens- 4hr
Flash: 300 lumens- 5hr

Run times seemed pretty consistent with spec, and when you run out of time, the Super Drive resorts to the 110 Lumen setting, and blinks intermittently to let you know you are running on the 15 minutes of reserve power.

The light has a simple protocol for the single button which has a rubber cover and is located near the front of the light body on the top side. Press the button for a couple of seconds and release to turn the unit on. This gets you to the highest setting, which is rated at 450 Lumen. Press once to lower the output to 300 Lumen, and once again to drop down to 110 lumen. One more push will yield a blinking pattern at the 300 Lumen level. Finally, hold the button down for a couple of seconds in any mode to shut the unit down. You do have to toggle all the way through the settings to get back to a higher out put. Maybe not an ideal set up, but the Super Drive does retail for MSRP $110.00, so I can forgive this little annoyance.

Performance: Lezyne makes some pretty heady claims for the Super Drive’s light performance. A light- no matter the power rating- is only as good as its optics. Would the Super Drive measure up? In a word: Yes. The beam pattern shows no “hot spots”, corona effects, or any weirdness at all. The light color is neither too blue or too warm/yellow, (for my eyes, at any rate. Yours may vary.). The intensity at 450 Lumen is great, and typically I stayed with the 300 Lumen setting to milk more run time from the light. But this was not a big compromise in my mind. The difference between 450 and 300 Lumen being negligible as far as what I could see.

I think you could definitely use the Super Drive as a casual single track light, and it is overkill for a commute. In fact, the 110 Lumen setting may be all you’d ever use in a city setting, the beam pattern and throw is that good. Plus, you’ll get more run time out of it. I used this light during a 65 mile snow bike event that took me from day into night. The 110 Lumen setting against a snow covered trail was all I could ask for in terms of not washing out the contours and giving me plenty of light thrown down the trail to cover ground as fast as I wanted to go.

Conclusions: The Super Drive is just, well…super. I can recommend it for anything from commuting to casual single track riding off road. Back road riding, gravel roads, or service roads would be this lights domain for sure. The mount is secure enough for rough riding, but severe, rock infested, fast down hill type mountain biking isn’t where this light should be used. Maybe as a good back up/bail out light for your current, high powered system perhaps.

The light charges as stated after a few charges, and otherwise I have no concerns about the Super Drive. The beam pattern is near perfect, and the performance for the dollar says “high value” here. I highly recommend this torch.

Mini Drive Review:

I received the Mini Drive model to review, the least powerful of the range of Lezyne’s LED bike lights.  Rated at 150L (lumens) on high, and with light level options for a 100L, 50L, and a high rate and slow rate flash, the Mini Drive looks poised to be a commuter special more than a true off-road bike light, but we shall see.  It charges like the bigger brother Guitar Ted tested, with a USB cable and a blinking LED (the same one that lights your way) to tell you the charging state.  I had some issues the second time I charged it in that the LED never stopped its slow flash even after all day of charging.  It is supposed to stop blinking when it is fully charged.   The circuit protected CR123a battery measured to be at its full capacity (with a DVM), so that seems like a bug with the programming of the unit I had.  I also played around with the cooling abilities of the Mini Drive by turning it on high and letting it sit at room temp while I hit the case with an infrared temp gun.  Beginning with 68.5* ambient temps, after 20 minutes it reached a high of 93* right at the emitter end of the unit.  However, putting a bit of air across the Mini Drive dropped the temps to 89* within 3 minutes.  Putting the light outside on a breezy 45* day, the external case temp plunged to 60* in 2 minutes.  It never got hot enough to self protect (the driver will lower the current if it overheats) and it would seem that the small case is plenty to keep up with the demands of the 150L output.

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

The physical size is super for the light output and the Mini Drive looks solid and tough.  It does not feel like a toy, but looks like a high quality flashlight.  The clamp holds the light well and it never bobbled or slipped on the bars, holding the light body very securely.  The beam pattern of the Cree XP type emitter and reflector is very spot in nature rather than flood so even with the 150L limit, it reaches out pretty well.  I used it off road and even at 20 mph speeds on fireroads, I had enough distance to the beam.  However, the overall pattern is not that pleasant as the hot spot gives way to a shadow quickly off center.  As well, there are some artifacts from part of the lens holder ‘fingers’ that I could see in the beam pattern that were annoying.

Battery life seems to be a bit limited and that is typical of an All-In-One light like this.  The battery can only be so big and still fit in there.  I would anticipate that a regular user of this light would charge it every time after use or expect a dim light mid-ride.

So what do we have in the Mini Drive?  I think the off road potential is limited, not just by the beam pattern, but the run time.  But really, no serious night rider will be looking at a 150L light for his main light source, and if he was, having to cycle through the High-Med-Low-Fast Flash-Slow Flash to get all the way around to High again is really annoying and a bit dangerous in a true off road light where you may need to go from Med to High in a moments notice.

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

But let’s step down our expectations a bit and put this light on a commuter’s handlebars, or a recreational rider that needs a light source for under a 2 hour ride. Now there the Mini Drive would be very good.  Most commutes are under an hour one way and as long as the light was charged while you were at work, it would have more than enough capacity for the journey.  And the flashy modes, something that is just annoying to a dedicated off road night rider, gains value as a ‘can you see me now?’ factor, even in the daytime.  Although Lezyne does not suggest it be used as a stand alone flashlight, obviously it could be removed from the bar clamp and used for roadside repairs, etc, especially since that typically would be done at less than the full 150L High setting.

TwentyNineInches.com Reviews the Super and Mini Drive LED Lights

In this mode of use I can overlook the faults of the Mini Drive and enjoy the small size, great build quality, easy charging, great mount (no silly rubber O rings) and decent price ($69.95 suggested retail) + bike shop warranty support.  It also has good potential as a helmet light for an off road rider, as long as the Mini Drive helmet light was in addition to the main bar mounted light.  For a first shot at lighting your bike’s path, Lezyne has hit the ball well.  Maybe not out of the park yet, but the fence is coming up fast.

NOTE: Lezyne sent out the Super Drive and Mini Drive lights out at no charge for test/review. We were not bribed nor paid for this review. we strove to give our honest thoughts and opinions throughout.

Specialized Lululemon Racing Team Ride With LEZYNE in 2012

specialized_lululemon-logo-lo_res

Specialized Lululemon Racing Team Ride With LEZYNE in 2012

San Luis Obispo, CA – Lezyne is proud to continue its commitment to professional women’s cycling by sponsoring the newly formed Specialized-lululemon team.

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Last October, Velocio Sports announced that the extremely dominant HTC-Highroad women’s team would continue in 2012 with new management and new title sponsors: Specialized Bicycle Company and lululemon athletica. This new dream team is made up of several current and former national champions, an Olympic gold medalist, and a several promising young athletes that are destined to be a driving force in the women’s peloton.

Returning members of the team include current German national road race champion Ina-Yoko Teutenberg, U.S. national time trial champion Evelyn Stevens, and former world time trial champion Amber Neban (USA). Velocio Sports Director, Kristy Scrymgeour and team manager, Ronny Lauke will use their extensive experience and success from Highroad Sports to lead this team to success.

“The team is made up of immensely strong women who also happen to have sterling careers to back them up,” says Lezyne Marketing Manager Patrick Ribera-McKay. “Lezyne is more than happy to partner with an industry standard and truly valued group of women such as these. Just as Lezyne is pushing at the forefront of product design and engineering, these women are pushing not only cycling in general, but women’s cycling forward at such a spectacular pace that we are simply trying to keep up. With a shared passion for perfection and a keen eye out for cycling and it’s future, Lezyne is extremely proud to be a partner of Specialized-Lululemon and the amazing women that encompass it.”

Lezyne’s Marketing team was in Carlsbad, California last December for the team’s winter training camp. There, Lezyne had the opportunity to sit down and interview some of the riders and get an inside look at the women who make up this amazing team. This overview video is the first of three videos that Lezyne captured at the camp.

The team wasted no time getting its first wins under its belt in 2012. On January 1st, Australian Chloe Hosking won the first round of the Jayco Bay Series in Geelong Australia. This was quickly followed the next day by teammate Loren Rawney, who took the first win of her professional cycling career at the second round of the Jayco Bay Series.

The Team will be riding with Lezyne hand pumps, multi-tools, tire repair, organizers, and saddle bags. The Team’s mechanics will use Lezyne floor pumps and shop tools.

To learn more about the Team click on the following links:

Specialized-lululemon official team page >>