The Alloy Floor Drive wins “Best on Test” with Cycling Plus

The Alloy Floor Drive wins

The Alloy Floor Drive wins “Best on Test” with Cycling Plus

“Lezyne brings its typical elegance, efficiency, and styling to this design.”

“This excellent pump is a joy to use. The Lezyne Alloy FD takes top honours for its balance of design, efficiency and performance.”

“It’s a straightforward, very well made design, with a superb wooden handle, a long hose and a very stable base – but it’s Lezyne’s Flip-Thread Chuck that we really like. The screw-on design provides a fantastic seal and can be used on valves where only small amounts of thread are showing. It’s flippable for Schrader valves plus has an extra screw-on head that pushes onto valves in the more usual way. For it’s balance of design, efficiency, and pumping performance it takes the top honours.”

“Lezyne really delivers with this classic pump. It has a superbly reassuring feel, aided by its comfortable varnished wooden handle, while the CNC-machined base and 15mm shaft make it very stable and the gauge is clear to read. Add in a long hose and great build quality and you’ve got a more than competent pump, but what really makes it is Lezyne’s excellent Flip-Thread Chuck. This does away with a locking lever, the reversible head screwing directly – and very securely – onto Presta valves for leak-free pumping every time.” www.upgradebikes.co.uk

The Alloy Floor Drive wins

The Sport Floor Drive in the test, although it didn’t win, surely made “top honours” as well, earning itself 5 starts and a very well-bolstered reputation.

Lezyne Micro Caddy Review by Road.cc

Lezyne Micro Caddy Review by Road.cc

Lezyne Micro Caddy Review by Road.cc

“Not everyone needs to take several rounds of sandwiches, a phone, a camera, a waterproof, a spare gear cable, three tubes, patches, a lucky Gonk and all the other saddlebag detritus that some deem necessary on a ride all stuffed into a saddlepack that would trouble a budget airlines baggage allowance. Others like to travel fast and light,…the Lezyne Micro Caddy (Small) is for those people.”

“With a capacity of a meagre 0.5L its cargo potential is plainly going to be fairly minimal. The main compartment is flanked by internal sleeves to hide delicate or pointy things away from the scrummage of the hold, the left-hand one ambitiously marked out by Lezyne for an inner-tube while the right-hand side is split into two; each about the right size to slip a slim tyre lever into. Storage space is extended with an outer pocket that’s graphiced up to suggest you fit your micro-tool in there, although it will have to be quite a mini micro tool to squeeze in.”

Lezyne Micro Caddy Review by Road.cc

“The Micro Caddy is constructed from weatherproof materials and has a waterproof zip holding everything in which keeps the contents from all but the world of rain and wheel spray. After particularly moist rides it’s prudent to take everything out and give it a wipe down though to avoid rusting of anything that can rust, it’s no big issue as you’d probably need to give the Caddy a good clean as well anyway after such a ride, especially if you’ve bought the white one, to match your shoes. Reflective piping adds a tenuous level of safety.”

Lezyne Micro Caddy Review by Road.cc

“The twin neoprene arms wrap around the saddle rails and Velcro onto the Lezyne’s body to provide a secure fastening without the need for a seatpost strap or any extra anti-eject security round the saddle rails, not even your favourite old toe-strap. This one has logged an impressive tally of miles and it hasn’t budged at all, and best of all as those neoprene arms can be pulled quite tight it hasn’t rattled in that Chinese water-torture way that goes mostly unnoticed by the rider but makes all your cycle companions want to kill you inefficiently with whatever tool is making the annoying noise.”

Lezyne Micro Caddy Review by Road.cc

“Obviously whether you can get all your preferred ride-saving kit into the small Micro Caddy depends on how much you think you need, it could be a struggle for some. Lezyne say the bag can hold a small multi-tool, a spare road tube and some tyre levers. With a bit of effort you can manage to stuff more in; currently this test one is holding a turquoise puncture repair box with patches, glue and some spare links hidden inside it, a pair of chunky tyre levers, a not so mini mini-tool with a chain-breaker on, a spoke-key and since that ride where the friend with the deep-section rims didn’t bring any valve extenders, one of them. And despite it bulging quite tumescently it hasn’t thrown itself off or spilled its load into the verge that’s quite enough of that – ed).

Verdict

For the lightweight rider that doesn’t feel the need to take their entire tool-chest with them on a ride than this is an excellent choice. Small enough to be forgotten about and not cause too much angst for the delicate lines of your elegant steed yet large enough, just, to fit the bare essentials in. And it doesn’t rattle.”

For the review at Road.cc, click HERE

Core77 Features Lezyne Products!

Lezyne Products

Core77 Features Lezyne Products!

Following our entry mentioning Birzman’s purty bike tools, reader Frank turned us on to Lezyne, a bicycle accessories company that’s just celebrated their 5th birthday last week. Lezyne’s products are borne from “a love for cycling [combined with] a passion for design—exquisitely designed, intelligently engineered, and functionally complete,” says the company, which was started by former triathlete Micki Kozuschek.

Although based in California, Kozuschek originally hails from Germany, explaining Lezyne’s striking, Teutonic aesthetic.

Lezyne Products

Lezyne Products

“‘In the old days, everything just worked. It didn’t look great, but it worked. Now some things look great, but they don’t last,’ Kozuschek told Velo News several years ago, when the company began expanding their product range. ‘We’re doing this differently.’ “

Lezyne Products

Lezyne Product

For the blog writeup itself, go ahead and click HERE.

Lezyne product line rundown on YouTube….

Kristin Armstrong Takes the Win, with Hughes and Stevens on the Podium in Second and Third

Exergy TWENTY12’s Kristin Armstrong wins the Merco Cycling Classic Time Trial. Evelyn Stevens of Specialized lululemon takes 3rd.

Photo: Joe Savola
Photo: Joe Savola

In Merced, California, it was a beautiful day in the California Central Valley. This was home for the Merco Cycling Classic Boosters Time Trial. It was Evelyn Stevens who was being chased down after having just won the Tour of New Zealand and beating the current World TT Champion Judth Arndt, Kristin Armstrong took a very convincing win over Canadian National TT Champion Clara Hughes and current U.S National TT Champion, Evelyn Stevens. Her time was 55 seconds faster than that of Clara Hughes. Exergy’s Alison Tetrick finished a very strong 4th place, behind Specialized lululemon’s Evelyn Stevens.

In an post-race interview, this is what Armstrong had to say: “Everything came together. I already know I’m on the best equipment out there and it was up to me to put in a solid winter of training and show up to time trials well prepared. I felt good today”.

It was an extremely good race weekend for both of the Lezyne-sponsored teams of Specialized Lululemon and Exergy TWENTY12, taking the entire podium for the women’s TT opener. Keep it rockin’ gals.

Olheiser Breaks Through at Rutas

Olheiser, of Competitive Cyclist kicks off the season nice and proper like.

olheiserrutas

Competitive Cyclist get season off to perfect start.

Competitive Cyclist’s first-year pro Mike Olheiser got his rookie season underway with an impressive solo win Tuesday at the first stage of the Rutas de Americas, a UCI 2.2 race in Uruguay.

Olheiser rode away from the fractured bunch in an effort to take a three-second KOM time bonus about 99 km into the 146 km opening stage from Montevideo to Minas. When no one in the field reacted to Olheiser’s move, the 37-year-old multiple masters time trial world champion pressed the issue and zeroed in on his first professional win.

“They gave him a good-sized gap, and I was like, ‘hmmm, they don’t know this guy can time trial like we do,'” said Competitive Cyclist director Gord Fraser. “It was really difficult terrain with a lot of up and down. He was able to get his momentum up on the downhills and really carry it over the rollers. So he just did a great job.”

The Rutas de Americas marks the team’s first foray into international racing after team leader Francisco Mancebo won the USA Cycling National Race Calendar individual title last year. Fraser said Olheiser’s first professional win in as many tries has already set the tone for a major team goal this season.

“I’ve been big on this word diversification of results, and we’ve certainly got it the very first race,” Fraser said. “So I couldn’t be happier for the guys. It’s good for the morale. We’re having a great time here already. It’s quite an adventure, and it’s certainly different than what we’re used to, so we’re rolling with it and having a good time. This will just set us up for the rest of the week without any pressure now.”

Mancebo started the fireworks Tuesday for Competitive Cyclist, soloing away from the bunch to win the first intermediate sprint at 28 km and grabbing the time bonus. The team continued to force the issue for the next 30 km, working with Porongos de Flores of Uruguay to keep the pace high over the rolling terrain.

Olheiser made his move after the peloton split into two groups. While teammates Mancebo and Chad Beyer rode heard on the ever-shrinking chase group behind, Olheiser battled to an eight-second gap at the finish. With time bonuses, Olheiser climbs into the overall race lead with a 14-second margin over Pablo Pintos of Uruguay. Fraser said Beyer was in position to take second on the stage when a Brasilian rider altered his line, causing Beyer to unclip to regain his balance and losing his spot.

The race continues Wednesday with the 150 km stage from ah9eme P. Varela to Melo. Fraser said his team will not be aggressively patrolling the front of the peloton to defend Olheiser’s lead, but will look for others to animate the race in the coming days.

“I still think it’s kind of a crap shoot, honestly,” Fraser said “There are so many factors that can go into it. We’re just really happy with the win. We’re not going to ride the front by any stretch. We’re going to play a more passive defense and try to engage the competition as much as possible and count on some local rivalries to see what shakes free.”

The six-day stage race ends February 26 with a stage from Trinidad to Montevideo. After the Rutas, Competitive Cyclist will split into two squads, with half the team contesting the Tour of Mexico while the other half heads to the San Dimas Stage Race and then Redlands Bicycle Classic for the USA Cycling National Race Calendar opener.

Follow Cyclingnews on Twitter for the very latest coverage of events taking place in the cycling world –twitter.com/cyclingnewsfeed

 

BikeRumor with Another Great Review of Lezyne Product

BikeRumor with Another Great Review of Lezyne Product

“It’s become my default pack pump.”

Lezyne’s Pressure Drive mini pump is a CNC aluminum mini pump that claims to go to 120psi. The overlapping barrel and handle with a detachable threaded hose makes for a compact package that easily slides into even the smallest hydration pack. It even does well inside a jersey pocket alongside a tube to keep it from bouncing around or sliding out too easily.

Lezyne claims the oversized barrel reduces the number of strokes required to fill a tire. I didn’t keep count, but getting a tubeless mountain bike tire or cyclocross tire up to riding pressure wasn’t terribly laborious. Filling a road tire wasn’t as much fun, which is sort of a shame because it does fit so well in a jersey and it’s really lightweight. That said, it’s far better than some other compact pumps I’ve used.

Fill up with the details after the break…

The ABS flexible hose threads onto the valve stem and has Presta on one end and Schrader on the other. Because it’s not a fixed part of the pump, you can really put some elbow grease into the pumping without fear of breaking the valve and ruining your ride (or at minimum your tube).

The threaded attachment has a pressure release valve to let air out of the pump hose before removing it to ease the release and keep it from popping off. The downside to threaded attachments is that they tend to pull removable valve cores with them, letting all your hard earned air right back out.

This problem isn’t exclusive to Lezyne. Some of their pumps include adapters to simple press onto the stem, so you could order one of those with your pump. Or you could get a threaded Presta-to-Schrader adapter and use that, but it takes away a little of the magic. And press-on tips aren’t going to stay on as well during vigorous pumping. A better solution is to get tubes or tubeless valves without removable cores, which is what I’m slowly replacing all of mine with.

When you’re done, you simply unthread it, slide it into the other end and thread it in flush:

Even with my large hands, it was comfortable to pump and didn’t heat up too much. Action is smooth and tight, it feels well constructed, and no air leaked out around the valve. It’s become my default pack pump.

The Lezyne Pressure Drive comes in gold (tested), black, red and blue and retails for $44.99.

BikeRumor’s review found HERE

Lezyne CRV 20 Multi Tool Review by BikeRadar

Lezyne CRV 20 Multi Tool Review by BikeRadar

Big and tough…ideal for tourists and off-road enthusiasts.

This is a great review by the guys and gals at BikeRadar. Radical work people.

The Lezyne CRV offers 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8mm Allen keys but no 10mm. Flat and Phillips screwdrivers along with a T25 Torx wrench.

There’s also a combined tyre lever and 10mm open-ended spanner, plus a disc brake pad separator/bottle opener combo. The large chain tool has Mavic, 3.22 and 3.45 metric spoke head slots. Unusually for a bike tool, the CRV 20 also has a serrated 2¼in blade.

The tool has a long body, which makes it a great choice for bigger leverage jobs like removing a sticky pedal or retightening a loose crank arm. Because the chain tool is fixed it can be a little awkward to use; it’s fine in an emergency situation but we wouldn’t recommend it for workshop use.

The 3mm Allen is fixed, which meant we had to find a spare one when the CRV20’s bolts started to loosen. The multi tool comes with a Neoprene wrap to hold everything in place when pocketed and give you protection from any spiky bits.

Build quality is excellent, with thick, forged aluminium side plates. The individual tools are hardened and we haven’t managed to chew any of the ends up yet. They’re also corrosion resistant, providing you give them a squirt of WD40 or the like now and again.

Lezyne CRV 20 Multi Tool Review by BikeRadar